Sunday, 14 March 2010

11 reasons to love the refuelling ban!! wiiieee

First of all, congratulation to Sebastien Vettel for a great pole position. I wish he will be the World Champion this year.

The F1 Sporting Working Group has been asked to come up with new ideas to “improve the show” in F1 in 2010. But the best decision to improve the show was taken this time last year. After 16 years, refuelling during the race is finally being banned. This will make F1 more exciting, easier to follow, less expensive and safer.
1. Qualifying will be more exciting
For the past few years whenever a driver pulled a quick lap out of the bag to snatch pole position the response was not “what a great lap” but “How much fuel has he got on board?”

This year when a driver hangs it all out and grabs the number one spot by a few thousandths we’ll know it’s because of what he got out of the car and not how little fuel was put in it.

The nay-sayers who insist it will lead to the fastest car always starting from pole position should pause to consider the last season in which we had proper low-fuel qualifying. Juan Pablo Montoya started from pole position seven times in 2002 – but never won a race.
2. Easier to compare drivers’ performances
With all drivers qualifying on low fuel we will be able to tell very easily who got the most out of their car over a single lap – especially between team mates. The tedious and contrived calculations about who did the best ‘fuel-adjusted’ lap will go in the bin.
3. Racing will be less artificial
Although knockout qualifying has brought an exciting dimension to Saturdays, it has created the strange phenomenon where drivers on row six can be better-placed strategically because they didn’t make it into the final ten and therefore have free reign on their fuel strategy.

In short, qualifying ninth or tenth can put you at a disadvantage compared to starting 11th or 12th. This artificial advantage will be neutered in 2010.
4. It will save the teams money
This is the main reason why refuelling is being axed – and it’s a sound one.

Lugging a pair of refuelling rigs per team around the world isn’t cheap, especially when there’s a bunch more new teams showing up.
5. No more fuel-saving means they’re flat out all the way
If the widespread use of in-car radio in F1 has shown us anything it’s that as soon as drivers get stuck behind a rival they concentrate more on trying to save fuel – and therefore pit later and more advantageously – than trying to overtake.

I doubt banning refuelling will lead to a lot more overtaking – that problem is more to do with the aerodynamic sensitivity of the cars and, to a lesser extent, track layouts.
6. Race strategy will be more interesting and exciting
Smart tyre strategy helped Schumacher win in 1993

Banning refuelling does not mean the death of race strategy. Instead, Grands Prix will have a strategic dimension which has more interesting consequences for the racing.

Now it will be all about which drivers can get through the race on a single tyre stop, nursing their car in the early stages on a heavy fuel load, and which ones have to make an extra stop. Already some commentators are talking up the chances of drivers who are kind to their tyres (like the current world champion) versus those who might not be (like the last one).
7. Fairer competition
F1 has never been properly set up for refuelling, in the modern era at least. F1 pits only permit one car to be serviced at any given time, forcing teams to run drivers on at least slightly different strategies.

So on occasions where the safety car has been deployed we have seen drivers’ races ruined because they had to queue up behind their team mate before they could take on fuel.

It’s disappointing no-one tried to fix this problem in the last 16 years, but at least it won’t matter any more now.
8. Harder for teams to favor one driver
There is no question there is always one fuel strategy that is superior to another – even if the difference is only a lap here or there.

Without refuelling it’s going to be a lot harder to have those “Team X always favours Driver Y” arguments in 2010.
9. More challenging for the drivers
No-one’s saying F1 is easy. But at the moment F1 drivers have to prepare their cars to work within a weight range of around 630kg to 700kg. That range will be roughly doubled this year, leaving them having to prepare cars that will handle radically different at the start of the race to the end, with lap times falling by around five seconds during the race.

That opens up a far greater scope for variety in set-ups, strategies and performance – not to mention potential for people to get things wrong and end up with a car that destroys its tyres at the beginning of a race or can’t get heat into them at the end.
10. More exciting pit stops
The pit stops that do happen will be brief, exciting bursts of energy as teams scramble to get four tyres off and on the cars as quickly as possible.

As refuelling almost always takes longer than a tyre change the pressure on the mechanics has been less severe in recent year.

But in 2010 how quickly they turn the car around will determine how little time their man loses. In 1993 Benetton whittled their best tyre change time down to a blink-and-you’ll-miss-it 3.2 seconds. Will any of the teams be able to top that this year? We will see.
11. Improved safety
Just as 16 years of development hasn’t stopped fuel rigs from failing, it also failed to weed out refuelling fires. There was a spate of fires at the Hungarian Grand Prix last year and more incidents this year too.

The trade-off for that is that cars will be carrying much more fuel at the start of a race, which is potentially an increased risk. However cars today are far less likely to catch fire on impact and marshals are much quicker at arriving on the scene than they used to be. On balance I suspect we’re better off this way.
But it will at least remove an incentive for a driver to sit back and not try to overtake, which can only be a good thing.
SRi:Lotus,don't make me down please..

3 comments:

  1. dulu ban tukar tyre. pastu after few years dia tarik balik ban tu sbb sume org duk complaint dangerous. skrang ni fuel plak. brapa lame kah rule ni akan bertahan? hurmmm~ (nanti ade je aksi cam massa dulu yg kete die stop betul2 lepas die cross finish line tu... hikhik~ ;p)
    *xbest la no refueling ni.. nanti kete tu slow sbb nk conserve fuel.
    *xsabar nye nk tgk brape byk kete yg stop sbb minyak abes.. hikhik~ ;p

    ReplyDelete
  2. hahhahahhaa..i like ur comment!we will see.. tpi aQ rase org yg bpotensi minyak paling cepat habis~ hamilton sbb dia suke push pastu break, pastu accelerate blik!paraah3~huhue

    tpi btol giller!tgk r dlu,brape byk kete yg tayar dia meletop! *especially race kat maalysia..smua takut2 jek nak bawak..hihi

    ReplyDelete
  3. pas ni ban jek race tu...senang!!hoooyeayh!!!hehe...wat skt at jek aku asek xdpt tgk...keje bc result jek..xmasyuk lgsong...tayar melotop ko..mnyak abeh ko???sumenye den xdpt nengok...uhuuuks

    ReplyDelete

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